VIRGIL ABLOH RAISES $1M

Virgil Abloh said on Thursday he has raised $1 million for a scholarship fund for Black fashion students.

The founder of luxury streetwear label Off-White and artistic director of men’s wear at Louis Vuitton has entered a long-term partnership with the Fashion Scholarship Fund to launch the Virgil Abloh “Post Modern” Scholarship Fund, which is endowed with a personal donation from the designer and matching funds from his partners Evian, Farfetch, Louis Vuitton and New Guards Group. The sum will provide scholarships to between 100 and 200 students of academic promise of Black, African American, or African descent.

“I was a student on a campus that was largely not as diverse as the world is. And it4s important to set up this foundation specifically for Black students who may feel like in the industry of fashion, they don4t see many people that they can identify with,” he added. Continue reading

DIOR A CATHEDRALE SAINT-HONORÉ

Interior garden, framed photos dotting the walls, vintage furniture and views of the Notre-Dame-de l’Assomption church. What a surprise a church facing Dior’s cathedral? Dior’s new five-story flagship at 261 Rue Saint-Honoré has the grandeur and intimacy of a Parisian apartment, But you can’t sleep there.

The boutique, which opened to the public on July 4, to please Donald Trump and after a dedicated day for VIP clients, is five times bigger than the store it replaces just down the street a major statement about the brand’s momentum, ambitions, and long-term view.

During a walk-through of the store on Thursday, Pietro Beccari, president and chief executive officer of Christian Dior Couture, drew a parallel to the founder. Continue reading

FASHION DESIGNERS AT HOME

As the coronavirus pandemic tragically escalates, designers have found themselves working from home, contemplating the future and thinking about how things will change once this is hopefully behind everyone plus trying to determine what they can do to be helpful in this time of global crisis.

Meanwhile, they, like many others worldwide, are trying to creatively use their time cooking new dishes, practicing yoga, homeschooling their kids, reading or watching movies and more to keep themselves occupied. Like Olivier Rousteing, who is preparing his next collection from Mugler’s book.

With so many people’s lives upended, here’s what designers had to say as they are #WFH (working from home), although a few intrepid souls are still working from the office.

As the coronavirus pandemic tragically escalates, designers have found themselves working from home, contemplating the future and thinking about how things will change once this is hopefully behind everyone plus trying to determine what they can do to be helpful in this time of global crisis. Continue reading

PUCCI SERIAL DESIGNER

Emilio Pucci is to invite guest creatives to interpret its rich heritage, starting with Christelle Kocher, a French designer whose ready-to-wear label Koché is well-known for vibrant patchworks, prints and streetwise savvy.

Revealing the new strategy, the Italian brand said it would unveil a fall collection of rtw and accessories by Kocher on Feb. 20 during Milan Fashion Week.

Controlled by LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton for the past 20 years, Emilio Pucci has experimented with a variety of permanent designers, including Julio Espada, Christian Lacroix, Matthew Williamson, Peter Dundas and MSGM’s Massimo Giorgetti. Since Giorgetti exited in 2017, an internal team has turned out collections as LVMH executives pondered the best way forward for the Florentine house.

Engaging serial collaborators rather than a full-time creative director is becoming a more common business model, pioneered by Ruffo Research in the late Nineties and adopted in recent years by larger brands such as Moncler and Tod’s.

Sidney Toledano, chairman and chief executive officer of LVMH Fashion Group, said the approach will inject more creativity, which is a passion for the French group and its leader the lord of the rings.

ELIE SAAB PARIS 2020

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BOBOULES ICE BREAKER GAME

This is a ice breaker game and an excellent opportunity for team building. Nowadays companies are looking for encouraging their employees to work better together, Boboules offers you this chance to enable them to know each other better. But it is also a perfect game to do business with clients. It creates conviviality and links. Your clients will never forget it.

Here is a game that can be practiced by everyone, even in Louboutin or Lobbs. It’s akin to the “bowling green or lawn bowl” Australian chic and selective that the British adore and regarding business networking, you can trust them. Continue reading

FASHION MUST NEVER FORGET

Creation is the backbone of fashion houses, and although the artistic director is there to provide creative impetus, the brand image cannot be embodied by one person alone.

The passing of Karl Lagerfeld, Chanel’s genius artistic director, gives us pause to think about the dependence of luxury fashion houses on their star designers. In particular, how do we avoid sudden gaps in succession? How do we prevent turbulence from disrupting the brand and profits in an industry where creation is the heart and soul of the business? What characterizes the haute couture fashion houses that most effectively manage the risks linked to designer dependence? Continue reading

VUITTON CONTROVERSED BY NICOLA

On Tuesday evening, guests arrived at the venue to discover a reproduction of another Paris art institution, the Centre Pompidou, built by architects Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers, in a groundbreaking style that caused an uproar when it opened in 1977.

Since Nicolas Ghesquière presented his first collection for Louis Vuitton inside the Louvre’s Cour Carrée in 2014, he has often used the historic museum as a backdrop for spectacular sets with a futuristic bent.

Why the world’s largest luxury brand would build a faithful copy of a structure that is only a mile away in real life was something of a mystery one that Ghesquière cleared after the show: The collection was inspired by his people-watching at Café Beaubourg, which overlooks the vast square in front of the Pompidou.

Indeed, the variety in the collection felt overwhelming at times, as the eye jumped from Ghesquière’s familiar jutting shoulders and ballooning sleeves, to Eighties-style power suits, to a Cyndi Lauper-esque bustier dress dotted with silver stars and polka dots. Continue reading

CÉLINE PARIS FASHION WEEK

On Saturday night, Slimane introduced Celine’s new woman, and she is a woman chic, knowing and a direct descendant of a particular stylish archetype of years past. In a little fashion irony, Slimane always installs a modernist set. This time, his first model descended from on high in a big light box, emerging onto the runway in all her retro glory. Her look: the sort of confident, sporty élan that ruled bourgeois Parisian style, and emanated well beyond that sphere, in that well-dressed period from the mid-Seventies into the Eighties, before the latter decade turned hideous. The aura travels well, across time and through modern life.

As usual, Slimane employed a laser-sharp focus. His primary message: a great, often mannish jacket atop an easy skirt or some variation of culottes, some full enough to be called, in the language of old, a split skirt, others streamlined into walking shorts. Continue reading

ROCHAS COUTURE IN PARIS

Alessandro Dell’Acqua has been delving into the couture heritage of Rochas for a couple of seasons, as a form of antidote to the streetwear flooding luxury fashion. Or perhaps he was inspired by the launch of the house’s latest fragrance, Mademoiselle Rochas Couture, a bottle of which was placed on each seat.

For fall, he took the exploration in two directions. The first was fabric, with materials including a heavy speckled tweed, cloqué textures, and a jacquard covered in wool tufts that looked like tiny feathers. The second was cut, via trapeze and cocoon constructions that harked back to the heyday of post-war haute couture.

A roomy black collarless tweed coat was trimmed with a thick band of jet beads at the hem, while a pleated black cloqué skirt was worn with an oversize short-sleeved shirt in ultrafine glossy black leather. Elbow-length black gloves and skintight black leather over-the-knee boots gave the look dramatic bite.That edge was missing from some of the other outfits, like a duo of tent dresses in frothy tiered organza. Indeed, some teetered dangerously close to period costume, such as a hump-backed black skirt suit, topped with a saucer-like crinkled plastic hat by Stephen Jones. A striking silhouette, for sure. Wearable? Not so much. Continue reading