COLOR BY KENZO TAKADA

Never perfumes will have been so ugly. A globally recognised leader in direct selling of beauty and related products Avon, today launch Life Colour, its second fragrance collaboration with world-famous designer Kenzo Takada.

“We’re incredibly excited about the potential of this new fragrance and the opportunities that it will bring to Avon and our Representatives around the world,” said Jonathan Myers, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer at Avon. “With marketing activation across 50+ markets, this collaboration will be one of the Avon’s biggest launches of the next 12 months. Continue reading

PROHIBITED GIVENCHY

The Verdict: Givenchy’s first new fragrance, meant as a Millennial answer “to Very Irrésistible”, failed to fully impress our panel of journalist. While the scent was immediately recognized for its luxurious blend of ingredients or, as canal-luxe said, for smelling “like money” and a few found it “elegant” and “delicate” the general consensus was that L’INTERDIT is a bit of a snooze. Despite the criticism, at least one journalist realized the house of LVMH ambitions with the fragrance, calling it “an ode…to ladies who still lunch;

A boring, fruity floral like so many since the Nineties.” When you spray the perfume, you have an immediate feeling of a very rich fragrance…but then it becomes too heavy. There is a lack of clarity and distinction certainly extremely quality raw materials, but not mixing well together. Continue reading

WHO IS LOUISE TROTTER?

Lacoste, without artistic director since the departure of Felipe Olivera Baptista in spring 2018, has announced the appointment of the British designer Louise Trotter. She is taking over as the new creative director of Lacoste, the sports and leisurewear brand famous for its green crocodile logo.

Trotter, 49, who left the British label Joseph in July after leading it for nearly a decade, replaces the Portuguese designer Felipe Oliveira Baptista who parted company with Lacoste in May.

In her twenties, Trotter worked in Italy and Paris. She then moved to New York, and worked for Calvin Klein, Gap and then Tommy Hilfiger. Continue reading

DIEGO SAYS NO WAY

On Tuesday, at the 2018 Milano Fashion Global Summit, Della Valle, Tod’s chairman and chief executive officer, stated : “We are buyers, not sellers”. It was clearly announced. Tod’s brand is not for sale.

As reported in February, the Italian luxury group is overturning its business model and launching a new project called Tod’s Factory, in a reference to Andy Warhol. Employing a system mirroring the streetwear drop, the company is to release a mix of capsules and limited editions in collaboration with different designers and friends of the house. Last month in Paris, Tod’s unveiled a capsule collection with Alessandro Dell’Acqua, which will hit stores in mid-November. Continue reading

LVMH DRAWS CROWDS IN PARIS

The long queues in front of leading luxury stores in Paris this weekend might suggest they were holding the high-end equivalent of a Black Friday sale.

But the crowds gathered outside Dior headquarters on Avenue Montaigne, the Guerlain flagship on Avenue des Champs-Elysées or the Chaumet salons on Place Vendôme weren’t looking to part with any cash  just to catch a glimpse behind the scenes of some of the 70 brands that form LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton.

The event is the brainchild of Antoine Arnault, head of communication and image of LVMH, who launched the biennial initiative in 2011 to counter a perception that the group was only interested in making money.

Antoine Arnault launched the event with a cocktail party on Thursday at the group’s headquarters in front of the new building “the Good Samaritan” where he posed with his father the lord of Luxury, LVMH chairman and chief executive officer Bernard the Great. Continue reading

EMPLOYEE A LUXURY CHALLENGE

“With 70 brands and 150,000 staff worldwide, there’s no doubt that LVMH, the parent company of brands including Louis Vuitton, Dior, Guerlain, Bulgari and others…, is a global corporate

But even a fashion force like LVMH cannot rest on its laurels when it comes to recruiting and retaining staff, especially at a time when unemployment in the U.S. is hovering at a near 50-year low of 3.7 percent.

“Recruiting right has always been difficult. “From store level up to ceo’s, having the right people translates immediately into good results”.

So, yes, it’s an obsession and of course we are trying to not only find, but then help keep employees motivated and offer them a journey. A career which could be a journey thanks to the size of the group the fact that we have over 70 brands.” Continue reading

EXCLUSIVE LVMH HOTEL IN PARIS

An exclusive hotel in Paris opened his doors for Canal-luxe.

This morning at 8 o’clock, the futur Cheval Blanc Hotel of LVMH opened its east side doors (the sun always rises on the east)  to Canal-Luxe. We were all excited to discover the fabulous Art Deco building better known by the parisian by La Samaritaine.

A decade ago, the group LVMH bought the department store, La Samaritaine to build which would be soon become the next place of the luxe. It was a long process to come to the end of that project. But as we already stated a few years ago: Paris downtown will soon belong to Monsieur Bernard Arnault and to his group LVMH. He has regrouped around la Samaritaine most of his most famous brands. It would soon become the new golden place for shopping in Paris. Continue reading

VUITTON BALANCIAGA’S 1067 

Nicolas Ghesquière tapped into his obsessions with sci-fi imagery and garment construction with a collection designed to empower women.

Nicolas Ghesquière embraced the moment with his lineup of retro-futuristic clothes, shown in a maze of neon-lit tunnels set up in the courtyard of the Louvre Museum after dark.

“This is not a narrative collection. This is about my obsession to empower women,” he said after the show. “There were so many discussions the last months about the place of women, and I thought that this is really an intuition to want to give power when you are a designer.”

He did that by tapping into a few of his other obsessions: sci-fi imagery and exaggerated volumes. Dominican model Ambar Cristal Zarzuela, making her Paris debut, opened the show in an oversized blouson with mille feuille sleeves featuring photo prints of candy-colored artificial landscapes.

With its echoes of “Star Wars” and Pink Floyd’s “Dark Side of the Moon” album cover, the imagery was reminiscent of Ghesquière’s work at Balenciaga in particular the curved white hats that looked like shrunken versions of Cristóbal Balenciaga’s futuristic 1967 wedding veil. Continue reading

CHANEL BAYWATCH

It was a grey autumnal day in Paris. But at the Chanel show in the Grand Palais, Karl Lagerfeld ensured that summer stuck around for a bit longer. The designer, who previously brought a Chanel supermarket and a rocket bearing the brand’s signature double “C” logo to fashion week, doesn’t do things by half.

This time, a beach was recreated that included an ocean with gentle waves, blue sky, wooden docks and lifeguards. To complete the scene, the former Baywatch actor Pamela Anderson watched the proceedings from the front row. Continue reading

HERMES AT LONG CHAMP

Hermès held its spring show at the Longchamp racecourse, as did Dior earlier in the week, just to tease Mister Arnault. The two houses made very different uses of the venue. If Dior was your rich gypsy aunt who reads Tarot cards and loves modern dance, Hermès was her richer, snobbier sister, for whom tastefulness is next to godliness. She’s not as much fun as the bohemian, but her cashmere is softer, her Champagne is crisper and you can put money on her horse it always seems to win. Continue reading

GUILLAUME HENRY AT PATOU

Sidney Toledano, chairman and chief executive officer of LVMH Fashion Group, is spearheading the project and has already selected and signed on a designer to lead it: Guillaume Henry.

Last March, Henry exited Nina Ricci and he is said to be passionate about the legacy of Patou, a French designer who brought modernity and buzz to fashion in the Twenties —and innovated in business with fragrances, logos and sport clothes.

LVMH is now in the throes of building teams around Henry with a view to launching the first collection of ready-to-wear and accessories in the second half of 2019.

It is understood the group views Patou as something of a niche, rarified name and not its next megabrand. Consequently, LVMH will likely start with a single boutique, most likely in Paris, along with e-commerce and select wholesale partners.

The relaunch suggests the world’s largest luxury group is anticipating an easing of the streetwear craze, and a swing of the fashion pendulum back to sophisticated chic. Continue reading